LIVELY OWL'S ULTIMATE CBD GUIDE

EVERYTHING YOU NEED TO KNOW ABOUT CBD

Hemp Seed Oil vs. CBD Oil — What’s The Difference?

Hemp seed oil and CBD oil are not the same product. Hemp seed oil has traditionally been used when cooking, and the seeds contain high levels of protein and essential fatty oils. Hemp seed oil does not contain any CBD or other cannabinoids. Also, you will not get the “high” associated with marijuana (cannabis) if you attempt to smoke the leaves or flower clusters of the hemp plant. It is a wonderful dietary supplement that has nutrients and proteins and can improve your overall health and well being when eaten or ingested.

There are many types of CBD oil and you need all the facts to accurately compare their qualities. Essential oils are extracted from marijuana in the same way that they are extracted from hemp. The oils extracted from marijuana are referred to as cannabis oil. Cannabis oil is only legal in those states where marijuana is legal. Extracts from marijuana contain CBD, but also contain enough THC to get you high. Thus, cannabis oil is a controlled substance.

When the essential oils of hemp are extracted, the result is raw hemp extract. This raw extract is then filtered and distilled to remove compounds such as waxes and chlorophyll. This will produce various classes of oils with varying purity and CBD content. These refined oils are called CBD concentrate or CBD distillate. Raw PCR hemp extract has terpenes as well as other compounds that are similar to CBD. It retains a natural balance of the cannabinoids and terpenes from the original plant, thus its called full-spectrum oil. CBD is often isolated and purified. Pure CBD is known as CBD isolate. In the pure form, at room temperature, cannabinoids are solid crystals and are colorless and odorless. CBD isolate can be consumed by itself or used as an ingredient in other products like edibles and beverages. It does not contain the beneficial terpenes and other cannabinoids naturally found in the plant.

CBD-rich oil is generally applied to CBD oil that was put through filtration and distillation to remove compounds like chlorophyll and waxes. The result has a higher concentration of CBD than the raw extract, hence CBD-rich oil. CBD-infused describes either a product that has been infused with purified CBD isolate, or a product infused with a CBD-rich, full spectrum concentrate. A product labeled correctly specifies which ingredients have been used. If it says “CBD” or “CBD isolate,” it is not full-spectrum. If it says “CBD-rich hemp oil (or extract)” or “full spectrum CBD oil,” you’re getting a full-spectrum.

Hemp Seed Oil vs. CBD Oil — What’s The Difference?

Hemp seed oil and CBD oil are not the same product. Hemp seed oil has traditionally been used when cooking, and the seeds contain high levels of protein and essential fatty oils. Hemp seed oil does not contain any CBD or other cannabinoids. Also, you will not get the “high” associated with marijuana (cannabis) if you attempt to smoke the leaves or flower clusters of the hemp plant. It is a wonderful dietary supplement that has nutrients and proteins and can improve your overall health and well being when eaten or ingested.

There are many types of CBD oil and you need all the facts to accurately compare their qualities. Essential oils are extracted from marijuana in the same way that they are extracted from hemp. The oils extracted from marijuana are referred to as cannabis oil. Cannabis oil is only legal in those states where marijuana is legal. Extracts from marijuana contain CBD, but also contain enough THC to get you high. Thus, cannabis oil is a controlled substance.

When the essential oils of hemp are extracted, the result is raw hemp extract. This raw extract is then filtered and distilled to remove compounds such as waxes and chlorophyll. This will produce various classes of oils with varying purity and CBD content. These refined oils are called CBD concentrate or CBD distillate. Raw PCR hemp extract has terpenes as well as other compounds that are similar to CBD. It retains a natural balance of the cannabinoids and terpenes from the original plant, thus its called full-spectrum oil. CBD is often isolated and purified. Pure CBD is known as CBD isolate. In the pure form, at room temperature, cannabinoids are solid crystals and are colorless and odorless. CBD isolate can be consumed by itself or used as an ingredient in other products like edibles and beverages. It does not contain the beneficial terpenes and other cannabinoids naturally found in the plant.

CBD-rich oil is generally applied to CBD oil that was put through filtration and distillation to remove compounds like chlorophyll and waxes. The result has a higher concentration of CBD than the raw extract, hence CBD-rich oil. CBD-infused describes either a product that has been infused with purified CBD isolate, or a product infused with a CBD-rich, full spectrum concentrate. A product labeled correctly specifies which ingredients have been used. If it says “CBD” or “CBD isolate,” it is not full-spectrum. If it says “CBD-rich hemp oil (or extract)” or “full spectrum CBD oil,” you’re getting a full-spectrum.

Know What’s In Your CBD Products

It’s so important to know what is in a product as they have different effects. Broad-spectrum CBD oil is made by combining CBD isolate and individual terpenes with an oil base. Full-spectrum CBD oil keeps its original concentrations of cannabinoids and terpenes found in raw PCR hemp extract. (all Lively Owl products are full-spectrum!) It is not made with natural CBD-rich extracts. The CBD and terpenes in broad-spectrum oils are stripped of the natural essence. Often, the terpenes used in these products are not from cannabis, but come from other, plant sources. Some use dangerous synthetic cannabinoids and terpenes. Broad-spectrum oils are less costly to produce, although they are not sold at a lower price. Companies that are less concerned with quality and effectiveness make things like this. If you’re spending money on CBD oil, get the real deal. Get Lively Owl. 

The type of cannabis that is widely known as “Marijuana”, although it looks similar to hemp, is very different. If you take the clusters of flowers from cannabis and extract the essential oils from them, what you get is CBD oil with high levels of delta-9 THC. This oil contains active compounds like terpenes and cannabinoids, both of which have measurable effects. One thing researchers have found is that Cannabidiol (CBD), a major component of cannabis, is actually insanely beneficial. CBD is a non-psychoactive component and can be extracted from cannabis and hemp in non-harmful ways. CBD has been shown to be an effective treatment for various conditions and as such has been quickly garnering widespread acceptance. Even some pet owners have found CBD useful in treating their pets for various conditions.

Know What’s In Your CBD Products

It’s so important to know what is in a product as they have different effects. Broad-spectrum CBD oil is made by combining CBD isolate and individual terpenes with an oil base. Full-spectrum CBD oil keeps its original concentrations of cannabinoids and terpenes found in raw PCR hemp extract. (all Lively Owl products are full-spectrum!) It is not made with natural CBD-rich extracts. The CBD and terpenes in broad-spectrum oils are stripped of the natural essence. Often, the terpenes used in these products are not from cannabis, but come from other, plant sources. Some use dangerous synthetic cannabinoids and terpenes. Broad-spectrum oils are less costly to produce, although they are not sold at a lower price. Companies that are less concerned with quality and effectiveness make things like this. If you’re spending money on CBD oil, get the real deal. Get Lively Owl. 

The type of cannabis that is widely known as “Marijuana”, although it looks similar to hemp, is very different. If you take the clusters of flowers from cannabis and extract the essential oils from them, what you get is CBD oil with high levels of delta-9 THC. This oil contains active compounds like terpenes and cannabinoids, both of which have measurable effects. One thing researchers have found is that Cannabidiol (CBD), a major component of cannabis, is actually insanely beneficial. CBD is a non-psychoactive component and can be extracted from cannabis and hemp in non-harmful ways. CBD has been shown to be an effective treatment for various conditions and as such has been quickly garnering widespread acceptance. Even some pet owners have found CBD useful in treating their pets for various conditions.

Ancient History of CBD

This may come as a shock, but no one even knew what CBD was as little as 45 years ago. Even more shocking is that people knew that cannabis was beneficial thousands of years ago. So what happened between now and then?

Well, it actually began with paper.

The use of hemp fibers in making paper dates back to over 2,000 years ago. In fact, archaeologists found hemp paper in a tomb in 1957 that has been dated between 140 and 87 B.C.. Paper made from hemp was stronger and lasted longer than paper made from wood pulp, which is what the paper we use today is made from. It was also safer in many ways, as the process for making it did not involve using a lot of harmful chemical agents, unlike wood pulp paper. Making hemp paper was a slow process, however, and with the onset of various government regulations, was not as economical to produce in large quantities. When hemp and cannabis were made illegal, no further research was done into making hemp paper faster, and more economical, to produce.

Let’s take a walk through time and discover how we got here.

Records have been discovered in China dating back to around 6,000 B.C., making them the earliest written texts that note the use of cannabis for medicinal purposes, although pottery and other artifacts have been found that were made with or by using hemp dating back to 8,000 B.C.. Human civilization had barely begun, which makes this even more intriguing. In ancient times, cannabis was used to relieve pain and treat various conditions. However, doctors also warned against using too much, as they believed it caused people to “see demons.” The Chinese emperor and herbalist, Chen-Nung, wrote about hemp’s medicinal uses 5000 years ago. This pharmacopeia also recorded its effects on malaria, female disorders, and other illnesses. He referred to hemp as Ma-fen, or “hemp fruit”. In around 2900 B.C., the Chinese Emperor Fu Hsi, credited by the Chinese with bringing civilization to China, made a reference to Ma, which is the Chinese word for cannabis. He noted that it was very popular medicine, possessing both yin and yang. More evidence of its use as medicine came to light, dating from around 2,700 B.C.. In the earliest editions of Shen-nun pen ts’ao ching (Divine Husbandman’s Materia Medico), which was written in 2737 B.C. by then Emperor Shen-nun (Divine Husbandman), the use of cannabis in various teas and ointments was said to relieve pain. Over time, as civilizations evolved, the use of hemp and its benefits as “medicinal” was also written about in medical texts and treatises throughout Asia. In 1550 B.C., in Egypt, the Ebers Papyrus makes note of using medical cannabis to treat inflammation. The Atharva Veda, one of four sacred scriptures, is a Hindu manuscript believed to have been written in India between 1500 B.C. and the end of the first century B.C.. Some believe it is referring to everyday living in the time, and it describes using various plants and seeds for many purposes.

To the people of ancient India, cannabis was believed to be sacred, a gift from the Gods. Additionally, the ancient tombs of Egyptians and Greeks were found to have cannabis stored in them, as well as hieroglyphs noting remedies using cannabis. India remained closely tied to cannabis use, including medicinally, religiously. Cannabis was and continues to be mixed into drinks that used for medical reasons. One of these drinks is bhang, which is a mix of cannabis paste (made from the buds and leaves), milk, ghee, and various spices. In the second century B.C., Hua Tuo touted the use of extracts of cannabis (sounds a bit like CBD) as an anesthetic and blood thinner.

Very soon, the ancient Romans jumped on board. In 70 A.D., Dioscorides, a physician in Nero’s army, listed medical marijuana in his Pharmacopoeia. In around 77 A.D. they recorded using hemp for healing. The respected scholar Pliny the Elder also put forth in his The Natural History treatise that extracts of cannabis were effective pain relievers. Clearly, the ancient arbiters of civilization found cannabis and hemp to have well defined benefits. No mention was made of any harm coming from the use of such extracts. In ancient China around 100 A.D., the Shennong Bencaojing, a medical book, refers to cannabis as dama: da meaning great and ma meaning cannabis, It notes that the flowers, seeds, and leaves of the plant are useful in medicine. Then, between 500 and 600 A.D., the Jewish Talmud mentioned the euphoriant effects of Cannabis.

Ancient History of CBD

This may come as a shock, but no one even knew what CBD was as little as 45 years ago. Even more shocking is that people knew that cannabis was beneficial thousands of years ago. So what happened between now and then?

Well, it actually began with paper.

The use of hemp fibers in making paper dates back to over 2,000 years ago. In fact, archaeologists found hemp paper in a tomb in 1957 that has been dated between 140 and 87 B.C.. Paper made from hemp was stronger and lasted longer than paper made from wood pulp, which is what the paper we use today is made from. It was also safer in many ways, as the process for making it did not involve using a lot of harmful chemical agents, unlike wood pulp paper. Making hemp paper was a slow process, however, and with the onset of various government regulations, was not as economical to produce in large quantities. When hemp and cannabis were made illegal, no further research was done into making hemp paper faster, and more economical, to produce.

Let’s take a walk through time and discover how we got here.

Records have been discovered in China dating back to around 6,000 B.C., making them the earliest written texts that note the use of cannabis for medicinal purposes, although pottery and other artifacts have been found that were made with or by using hemp dating back to 8,000 B.C.. Human civilization had barely begun, which makes this even more intriguing. In ancient times, cannabis was used to relieve pain and treat various conditions. However, doctors also warned against using too much, as they believed it caused people to “see demons.” The Chinese emperor and herbalist, Chen-Nung, wrote about hemp’s medicinal uses 5000 years ago. This pharmacopeia also recorded its effects on malaria, female disorders, and other illnesses. He referred to hemp as Ma-fen, or “hemp fruit”. In around 2900 B.C., the Chinese Emperor Fu Hsi, credited by the Chinese with bringing civilization to China, made a reference to Ma, which is the Chinese word for cannabis. He noted that it was very popular medicine, possessing both yin and yang. More evidence of its use as medicine came to light, dating from around 2,700 B.C.. In the earliest editions of Shen-nun pen ts’ao ching (Divine Husbandman’s Materia Medico), which was written in 2737 B.C. by then Emperor Shen-nun (Divine Husbandman), the use of cannabis in various teas and ointments was said to relieve pain. Over time, as civilizations evolved, the use of hemp and its benefits as “medicinal” was also written about in medical texts and treatises throughout Asia. In 1550 B.C., in Egypt, the Ebers Papyrus makes note of using medical cannabis to treat inflammation. The Atharva Veda, one of four sacred scriptures, is a Hindu manuscript believed to have been written in India between 1500 B.C. and the end of the first century B.C.. Some believe it is referring to everyday living in the time, and it describes using various plants and seeds for many purposes.

To the people of ancient India, cannabis was believed to be sacred, a gift from the Gods. Additionally, the ancient tombs of Egyptians and Greeks were found to have cannabis stored in them, as well as hieroglyphs noting remedies using cannabis. India remained closely tied to cannabis use, including medicinally, religiously. Cannabis was and continues to be mixed into drinks that used for medical reasons. One of these drinks is bhang, which is a mix of cannabis paste (made from the buds and leaves), milk, ghee, and various spices. In the second century B.C., Hua Tuo touted the use of extracts of cannabis (sounds a bit like CBD) as an anesthetic and blood thinner.

Very soon, the ancient Romans jumped on board. In 70 A.D., Dioscorides, a physician in Nero’s army, listed medical marijuana in his Pharmacopoeia. In around 77 A.D. they recorded using hemp for healing. The respected scholar Pliny the Elder also put forth in his The Natural History treatise that extracts of cannabis were effective pain relievers. Clearly, the ancient arbiters of civilization found cannabis and hemp to have well defined benefits. No mention was made of any harm coming from the use of such extracts. In ancient China around 100 A.D., the Shennong Bencaojing, a medical book, refers to cannabis as dama: da meaning great and ma meaning cannabis, It notes that the flowers, seeds, and leaves of the plant are useful in medicine. Then, between 500 and 600 A.D., the Jewish Talmud mentioned the euphoriant effects of Cannabis.

CBD’s History In The West

Cannabis put down roots in Western civilizations, too. Hemp and cannabis were considered so valuable that Henry VIII ordered all his farmers to grow the crops in 1533. They were required to grow at least one quarter acre of the hemp plant out of every 60 acres tilled for use. They were fined by the crown if they did not comply. At the start of the 1500s, the Spanish brought cannabis to South America, but in the North American colonies, there was only hemp and it was used for practical purposes like clothes, bagging, paper, and ropes for the maritime industry. The hemp industry mostly relied on slave labor, and cannabis wasn’t known in America as a medicinal drug until many years later. Many physicians were keeping written records of using extracts from cannabis and hemp as not only an antibiotic, but also to stimulate the appetite, including Garcia de Orta in 1563 and Li Shih-chen in 1578.

In Africa, hemp was used to treat dysentery, snake bites, fevers, and women smoked it before childbirth. Long before the colonists in North America fought to become their own country, cultivating hemp was mandatory. Jean Talon, on orders of Quebec’s colony minister, confiscated all the thread the colonists had and forced them to buy it back from him with hemp. Talon supplied the seeds to farmers, which were then reimbursed after the crops were harvested. Mandatory cultivation of hemp continued throughout the New World.

Hemp was widely used by this time, all over the world. The word canvas is derived from the word cannabis and was made from hemp fibers. Canvas was used in sail making because it was stronger than cotton based cloth and was more resistant to the deteriorating effects of salt water. Britain mandated that hemp be grown in all the colonies where it could be grown. The colonists had to ship the harvested hemp back to England, then purchase finished hemp products from England. The British also began cultivating hemp in the Canadian colonies in 1606. The Virginia Colony even passed laws in the 1600s making it a crop that had to be grown.

Connecticut and Massachusetts followed their sister colony’s lead and required farmers to cultivate the valuable hemp plant. The seeds from hemp were worth their weight in gold and silver, so much so that in Maryland, Virginia, and Pennsylvania people would use them to pay for a variety of services and necessary items, even taxes! Hemp seeds were, essentially, legal tender. In 1621, Robert Burton, who authored the popular text of medical practices “Anatomy of Melancholy”, made note of the benefit of using an extract of hemp to treat mental disorders, including depression, and applying hemp roots to the skin to treat inflammation. As Western civilization entered the 18th century, the medicinal benefits of using hemp were documented in two more respected medical texts. One was “The New England Dispensatory” in 1764, and the other was “The Edinburgh New Dispensatory” in 1794. Both were very highly regarded as leading pharmacopeias of the day. By the start of the 1800s, New York, Nebraska, California, Kentucky, South Carolina, Georgia and Mississippi all had very productive marijuana plantations. By the 1840s, cannabis based medicinal products were widely available.

The burgeoning industrial age in America brought many new things while still hanging on to some old ones. In 1842, W.B. O’Shaughnessy, a surgeon and a professor in the Medical College of Calcutta, brought the use of hemp and cannabis firmly into the new age. Conducting experiments on both humans and animals, O’Shaughnessy sought to discover what, if any, effects extracts of hemp and cannabis would have on those suffering various conditions. These included tetanus, hydrophobia, rheumatic ailments, and cholera. He also included in his writings whether extracts of hemp and cannabis would alleviate muscle spasms and provide relief from pain. In 1850, the third edition of the respected U.S. Pharmacopeia lists hemp and its extracts as an effective anti depressant, pain reliever, and sleep aid, even going so far as to state it was preferable to newly developed opioids of the day. At that time, throughout the U.S., people were using marijuana medicinally and was available in many general stores and pharmacies. Noted British doctor J.R. Reynolds also researched the benefits of using extracts of hemp to treat asthma and reduce “tics” near the end of the 19th century.

CBD’s History In The West

Cannabis put down roots in Western civilizations, too. Hemp and cannabis were considered so valuable that Henry VIII ordered all his farmers to grow the crops in 1533. They were required to grow at least one quarter acre of the hemp plant out of every 60 acres tilled for use. They were fined by the crown if they did not comply. At the start of the 1500s, the Spanish brought cannabis to South America, but in the North American colonies, there was only hemp and it was used for practical purposes like clothes, bagging, paper, and ropes for the maritime industry. The hemp industry mostly relied on slave labor, and cannabis wasn’t known in America as a medicinal drug until many years later. Many physicians were keeping written records of using extracts from cannabis and hemp as not only an antibiotic, but also to stimulate the appetite, including Garcia de Orta in 1563 and Li Shih-chen in 1578.

In Africa, hemp was used to treat dysentery, snake bites, fevers, and women smoked it before childbirth. Long before the colonists in North America fought to become their own country, cultivating hemp was mandatory. Jean Talon, on orders of Quebec’s colony minister, confiscated all the thread the colonists had and forced them to buy it back from him with hemp. Talon supplied the seeds to farmers, which were then reimbursed after the crops were harvested. Mandatory cultivation of hemp continued throughout the New World.

Hemp was widely used by this time, all over the world. The word canvas is derived from the word cannabis and was made from hemp fibers. Canvas was used in sail making because it was stronger than cotton based cloth and was more resistant to the deteriorating effects of salt water. Britain mandated that hemp be grown in all the colonies where it could be grown. The colonists had to ship the harvested hemp back to England, then purchase finished hemp products from England. The British also began cultivating hemp in the Canadian colonies in 1606. The Virginia Colony even passed laws in the 1600s making it a crop that had to be grown.

Connecticut and Massachusetts followed their sister colony’s lead and required farmers to cultivate the valuable hemp plant. The seeds from hemp were worth their weight in gold and silver, so much so that in Maryland, Virginia, and Pennsylvania people would use them to pay for a variety of services and necessary items, even taxes! Hemp seeds were, essentially, legal tender. In 1621, Robert Burton, who authored the popular text of medical practices “Anatomy of Melancholy”, made note of the benefit of using an extract of hemp to treat mental disorders, including depression, and applying hemp roots to the skin to treat inflammation. As Western civilization entered the 18th century, the medicinal benefits of using hemp were documented in two more respected medical texts. One was “The New England Dispensatory” in 1764, and the other was “The Edinburgh New Dispensatory” in 1794. Both were very highly regarded as leading pharmacopeias of the day. By the start of the 1800s, New York, Nebraska, California, Kentucky, South Carolina, Georgia and Mississippi all had very productive marijuana plantations. By the 1840s, cannabis based medicinal products were widely available.

The burgeoning industrial age in America brought many new things while still hanging on to some old ones. In 1842, W.B. O’Shaughnessy, a surgeon and a professor in the Medical College of Calcutta, brought the use of hemp and cannabis firmly into the new age. Conducting experiments on both humans and animals, O’Shaughnessy sought to discover what, if any, effects extracts of hemp and cannabis would have on those suffering various conditions. These included tetanus, hydrophobia, rheumatic ailments, and cholera. He also included in his writings whether extracts of hemp and cannabis would alleviate muscle spasms and provide relief from pain. In 1850, the third edition of the respected U.S. Pharmacopeia lists hemp and its extracts as an effective anti depressant, pain reliever, and sleep aid, even going so far as to state it was preferable to newly developed opioids of the day. At that time, throughout the U.S., people were using marijuana medicinally and was available in many general stores and pharmacies. Noted British doctor J.R. Reynolds also researched the benefits of using extracts of hemp to treat asthma and reduce “tics” near the end of the 19th century.

Modern CBD History

The 20th century saw the rise of newly discovered opioids and the decline of all things cannabis related, in spite of its proven pain relieving benefits.

In 1906 the Pure Food and Drug Act was passed, which required labeling drugs so people would know what was in them. The resistance to cannabis began in earnest in the late 1930s. Federal restriction of the sale and use of cannabis first occurred in 1937 with the passing of the Marijuana Tax Act. Suddenly, it was made illegal to grow or use cannabis, and negative propaganda flourished. The newly incited and widespread fear of this plant was made worse by American business owners, lawmakers, and mainstream media. Some of these men had a truly vested interest in seeing that cannabis and hemp were prohibited. William Randolph Hearst, for example, was very keen to have these plants made illegal. His company was a consumer of the cheaper wood pulp paper that was developed late in the 19th century. The Hearst Corporation was also a logging company and a manufacturer of wood pulp paper, so wood pulp paper was making him more money. Hearst Newspapers were also largely responsible for the anti cannabis hysteria that gripped the nation at this time. Hearst, along with the CEO of the DuPont Petrochemical Company, lobbied excessively for hemp and cannabis to be outlawed in the U.S.. Du Pont’s company produced the chemicals that were used to treat the wood pulp during the paper making process. Another key player in making these plants illegal was Secretary of the Treasury Andrew Mellon, who was a political ally and financial backer of Du Pont.

The message to the masses was clear: Hemp and cannabis are bad, not good.

Following the act of 1937, cannabis was stricken from the United States Pharmacopoeia in 1942, with legal penalties increasing in 1951 with the Boggs Act and in 1956 with the Narcotic Control Act. In 1970, growing cannabis or hemp was put under an official ban with the Controlled Substances Act. These legislative actions also set limitations on research. This ban listed both plants as Schedule 1 substances, meaning that both were thought to risk dependency and neither had medicinal value. Just prior to this, in the last years of the 1960s, the human endocannabinoid system and cannabinoids were discovered by researchers. They also inadvertently put a name to the cannabis extracts used by the ancient Chinese with the rediscovery of CBD. Despite being illegal, extracts from cannabis were again being used medicinally throughout the 1970s.

In 1996, California made history when they made marijuana (cannabis) legal for medical use and decided on which medical conditions would be granted approval for its use. In the decades following the state’s momentous decision, the benefits of cannabinoids and CBD have been researched extensively, including the creation of a process that removes the psychoactive element.

In the U.S., CBD has gained widespread acceptance. The media has been largely responsible for this due to the positive coverage they have given experts like Dr. Sanjay Gupta. This is in sharp contrast to the fear mongering they indulged in during the early part of the 20th century and throughout the intervening years. These days, the message has reached the masses yet again, but the message now is: CBD is good not bad. Now, nearly everyone has access to CBD oil.

Due to the recent push against opioids, research into the effects of CBD on humans has increased at a frantic pace. New technology, like nanoemulsions, have made huge strides in isolating and refining CBD, and have even increased the bioavailability of CBD oil. This process makes it water soluble and increases its potency.

Welcome back to the present, where there is still controversy, but continual developments into the unique benefits of cannabis and CBD. Many people have no idea what CBD even is, much less why there is so much debate over it.

Modern CBD History

The 20th century saw the rise of newly discovered opioids and the decline of all things cannabis related, in spite of its proven pain relieving benefits.

In 1906 the Pure Food and Drug Act was passed, which required labeling drugs so people would know what was in them. The resistance to cannabis began in earnest in the late 1930s. Federal restriction of the sale and use of cannabis first occurred in 1937 with the passing of the Marijuana Tax Act. Suddenly, it was made illegal to grow or use cannabis, and negative propaganda flourished. The newly incited and widespread fear of this plant was made worse by American business owners, lawmakers, and mainstream media. Some of these men had a truly vested interest in seeing that cannabis and hemp were prohibited. William Randolph Hearst, for example, was very keen to have these plants made illegal. His company was a consumer of the cheaper wood pulp paper that was developed late in the 19th century. The Hearst Corporation was also a logging company and a manufacturer of wood pulp paper, so wood pulp paper was making him more money. Hearst Newspapers were also largely responsible for the anti cannabis hysteria that gripped the nation at this time. Hearst, along with the CEO of the DuPont Petrochemical Company, lobbied excessively for hemp and cannabis to be outlawed in the U.S.. Du Pont’s company produced the chemicals that were used to treat the wood pulp during the paper making process. Another key player in making these plants illegal was Secretary of the Treasury Andrew Mellon, who was a political ally and financial backer of Du Pont.

The message to the masses was clear: Hemp and cannabis are bad, not good.

Following the act of 1937, cannabis was stricken from the United States Pharmacopoeia in 1942, with legal penalties increasing in 1951 with the Boggs Act and in 1956 with the Narcotic Control Act. In 1970, growing cannabis or hemp was put under an official ban with the Controlled Substances Act. These legislative actions also set limitations on research. This ban listed both plants as Schedule 1 substances, meaning that both were thought to risk dependency and neither had medicinal value. Just prior to this, in the last years of the 1960s, the human endocannabinoid system and cannabinoids were discovered by researchers. They also inadvertently put a name to the cannabis extracts used by the ancient Chinese with the rediscovery of CBD. Despite being illegal, extracts from cannabis were again being used medicinally throughout the 1970s.

In 1996, California made history when they made marijuana (cannabis) legal for medical use and decided on which medical conditions would be granted approval for its use. In the decades following the state’s momentous decision, the benefits of cannabinoids and CBD have been researched extensively, including the creation of a process that removes the psychoactive element.

In the U.S., CBD has gained widespread acceptance. The media has been largely responsible for this due to the positive coverage they have given experts like Dr. Sanjay Gupta. This is in sharp contrast to the fear mongering they indulged in during the early part of the 20th century and throughout the intervening years. These days, the message has reached the masses yet again, but the message now is: CBD is good not bad. Now, nearly everyone has access to CBD oil.

Due to the recent push against opioids, research into the effects of CBD on humans has increased at a frantic pace. New technology, like nanoemulsions, have made huge strides in isolating and refining CBD, and have even increased the bioavailability of CBD oil. This process makes it water soluble and increases its potency.

Welcome back to the present, where there is still controversy, but continual developments into the unique benefits of cannabis and CBD. Many people have no idea what CBD even is, much less why there is so much debate over it.

So, What Exactly Is CBD?

CBD oil is extolled as a natural alternative to chemical based pharmaceuticals. It is an essential oil produced by extraction from the leaves and flower clusters of cannabis or hemp. This extracted oil has various active compounds, including terpenes and cannabinoids. Research has shown that it is non-toxic and it is not addictive, a pointed contrast to its pharmaceutical alternatives. Some CBD products may also have other ingredients, including hemp seed oil. As mentioned previously, this oil contains many helpful nutrients.

CBD is extracted from cannabis and hemp, and these two plants are of the genus Cannabacae. Of the species included in this genus, the two main ones used by humans are Cannabis sativa and Cannabis indica, although the breeding of hybrids has become hugely popular. Sativas grow taller and are more fibrous, marking it as the species from which the hemp plant was derived. Indicas tend to be short and bushy, as well as being somewhat more difficult to cultivate. However, because of the high content of medically beneficial compounds, it is also the preferred plant for medicinal use. These two species are often affectionately called “marijuana”. The main thing that sets marijuana apart from hemp is the high content of delta-9 tetrahydrocannabinol, or THC. This is the psychoactive component of the plant that promotes a euphoric, or giddy, feeling, also called a “high”. Because of this, it is considered by many to be a drug.

Despite many states in the U.S. having changed their individual state laws to allow for the medicinal and even recreational use of marijuana, the federal government still has it classified as a Schedule 1 controlled substance. The punishments for growing, possessing, and using marijuana remain varied and, in some cases, severe.

So, What Exactly Is CBD?

CBD oil is extolled as a natural alternative to chemical based pharmaceuticals. It is an essential oil produced by extraction from the leaves and flower clusters of cannabis or hemp. This extracted oil has various active compounds, including terpenes and cannabinoids. Research has shown that it is non-toxic and it is not addictive, a pointed contrast to its pharmaceutical alternatives. Some CBD products may also have other ingredients, including hemp seed oil. As mentioned previously, this oil contains many helpful nutrients.

CBD is extracted from cannabis and hemp, and these two plants are of the genus Cannabacae. Of the species included in this genus, the two main ones used by humans are Cannabis sativa and Cannabis indica, although the breeding of hybrids has become hugely popular. Sativas grow taller and are more fibrous, marking it as the species from which the hemp plant was derived. Indicas tend to be short and bushy, as well as being somewhat more difficult to cultivate. However, because of the high content of medically beneficial compounds, it is also the preferred plant for medicinal use. These two species are often affectionately called “marijuana”. The main thing that sets marijuana apart from hemp is the high content of delta-9 tetrahydrocannabinol, or THC. This is the psychoactive component of the plant that promotes a euphoric, or giddy, feeling, also called a “high”. Because of this, it is considered by many to be a drug.

Despite many states in the U.S. having changed their individual state laws to allow for the medicinal and even recreational use of marijuana, the federal government still has it classified as a Schedule 1 controlled substance. The punishments for growing, possessing, and using marijuana remain varied and, in some cases, severe.

CBD Hemp Oil Is NOT Marijuana

Hemp and marijuana are not the same, despite sharing a genus and even a species. One reason, as stated before, is that hemp does not contain all the same components in the same amounts as marijuana. However, it goes a bit deeper than that. Hemp does not contain much THC, either. In order to grow hemp under the current structure of the law, it cannot have a concentration of THC greater than 0.3 percent. Because of that, and combined with the lack of other active compounds, hemp has not been the favored plant for extracting CBD oil. In some cases, however, it is used for CBD oil for that very reason, and with great success.

There is much still unknown about CBD oil, and that leads to much confusion. The production of CBD oil is loosely regulated at best, making it difficult for the general public to understand what its really all about. Often, the blame for the confusion can be laid directly at the feet of the mainstream media. They often conflate marijuana and hemp, either because they don’t realize or simply don’t care that the two plants are vastly different. The four most common points for confusion in the public about CBD oil are whether it is legal, whether it will get you high, whether using it will produce a failed drug test, and what the side effects may be.

To clear up the first point, hemp extracts are considered food products, much like vanilla extracts. As such, they are completely legal. The main reason for the confusion about it is because many people do not realize that hemp and marijuana are not the same. CBD oil extracted from hemp is also very different than CBD oil extracted from cannabis. Hemp based CBD oil is legal everywhere, whereas cannabis based CBD oil is only legal in states where marijuana is legal.

CBD Hemp Oil Is NOT Marijuana

Hemp and marijuana are not the same, despite sharing a genus and even a species. One reason, as stated before, is that hemp does not contain all the same components in the same amounts as marijuana. However, it goes a bit deeper than that. Hemp does not contain much THC, either. In order to grow hemp under the current structure of the law, it cannot have a concentration of THC greater than 0.3 percent. Because of that, and combined with the lack of other active compounds, hemp has not been the favored plant for extracting CBD oil. In some cases, however, it is used for CBD oil for that very reason, and with great success.

There is much still unknown about CBD oil, and that leads to much confusion. The production of CBD oil is loosely regulated at best, making it difficult for the general public to understand what its really all about. Often, the blame for the confusion can be laid directly at the feet of the mainstream media. They often conflate marijuana and hemp, either because they don’t realize or simply don’t care that the two plants are vastly different. The four most common points for confusion in the public about CBD oil are whether it is legal, whether it will get you high, whether using it will produce a failed drug test, and what the side effects may be.

To clear up the first point, hemp extracts are considered food products, much like vanilla extracts. As such, they are completely legal. The main reason for the confusion about it is because many people do not realize that hemp and marijuana are not the same. CBD oil extracted from hemp is also very different than CBD oil extracted from cannabis. Hemp based CBD oil is legal everywhere, whereas cannabis based CBD oil is only legal in states where marijuana is legal.

Common Concerns About CBD

1. Will CBD make me “high”?
No, hemp-based CBD oil will not get you high if it is produced properly. The reason is that the concentration of THC in the hemp based products is not high enough. THC is the active compound in cannabis that triggers certain receptors in the brain which causes the high many people seek. CBD oil extracted from hemp does not affect these particular receptors, and may, in fact, inhibit THC from affecting them. Some hemp based CBD oils do contain very low levels of THC, but they still would not get you high.

2. What About CBD and Drug Tests?
Drug tests are not designed to detect CBD. If it is properly extracted, hemp based CBD oil will not cause the test to read positive for THC. However, oils extracted from cannabis may result in a THC positive result. Even those hemp based products that contain the legal limit of THC (0.3 percent) will most likely not result in a positive test reading. Make sure that the product you use does not contain any THC if passing or failing a drug test may result in loss of employment or legal ramifications.

3. What Are Side Effects of CBD?
Pharmaceutical drugs are developed to target particular systems and promote particular effects, but nature is not that precise. The effects of many compounds vary from person to person. Herbal compounds can have both desired effects and unwanted effects. These unwanted effects are called adverse side effects. The side effects of CBD oil are negligible and vary widely, as no two people are affected exactly the same.

However, for it to be a side effect you have to have a clear idea of the effect you are looking for. For instance, if your goal is to get your metabolism regulated and thereby lose weight, an undesired effect (side effect) would be an increase in appetite. If your desired goal is gaining weight, increasing your appetite would be a desired effect, not a side effect.

CBD oil will affect different people in different ways, just as many things do. It may cause drowsiness in some people while increasing energy in others, and it may make you more drowsy the more you use of it. If this is a concern, the best bet is to start with small daily doses and work your way up.

Common Concerns About CBD

1. Will CBD make me “high”?
No, hemp-based CBD oil will not get you high if it is produced properly. The reason is that the concentration of THC in the hemp based products is not high enough. THC is the active compound in cannabis that triggers certain receptors in the brain which causes the high many people seek. CBD oil extracted from hemp does not affect these particular receptors, and may, in fact, inhibit THC from affecting them. Some hemp based CBD oils do contain very low levels of THC, but they still would not get you high.

2. What About CBD and Drug Tests?
Drug tests are not designed to detect CBD. If it is properly extracted, hemp based CBD oil will not cause the test to read positive for THC. However, oils extracted from cannabis may result in a THC positive result. Even those hemp based products that contain the legal limit of THC (0.3 percent) will most likely not result in a positive test reading. Make sure that the product you use does not contain any THC if passing or failing a drug test may result in loss of employment or legal ramifications.

3. What Are Side Effects of CBD?
Pharmaceutical drugs are developed to target particular systems and promote particular effects, but nature is not that precise. The effects of many compounds vary from person to person. Herbal compounds can have both desired effects and unwanted effects. These unwanted effects are called adverse side effects. The side effects of CBD oil are negligible and vary widely, as no two people are affected exactly the same.

However, for it to be a side effect you have to have a clear idea of the effect you are looking for. For instance, if your goal is to get your metabolism regulated and thereby lose weight, an undesired effect (side effect) would be an increase in appetite. If your desired goal is gaining weight, increasing your appetite would be a desired effect, not a side effect.

CBD oil will affect different people in different ways, just as many things do. It may cause drowsiness in some people while increasing energy in others, and it may make you more drowsy the more you use of it. If this is a concern, the best bet is to start with small daily doses and work your way up.

What Is Cannabidiol and Cannabinoids?

CBD stands for cannabidiol. Cannabidiol is one of the many active compounds found in both cannabis and hemp. THC stands for delta-9 tetrahydrocannabinol (see why it was shortened to just three letters?) and is the psychoactive component in marijuana that is not found in large quantities in hemp. This is the component that can cause giddiness and euphoria (the high), among other effects. Cannabichromene, or CBC (good heavens! Glad they shorten them!), is non psychoactive and is thought to be an anti-fungal, anti-inflammatory, and anti depressant component. Cannabinol, or CBN, is believed to be an appetite stimulant, anti-asthmatic, antibiotic, sedative, and pain relieving component. Wow! It kind of makes you wonder who thinks up these names and if they get paid by the letter!

To continue, Cannabigerol, or CBG, is another component that is not psychoactive. It is an effective pain reliever, antibiotic, and anti-depressant. Moving on, Tetrahydrocannabivarin, thankfully shortened to THCv (seriously, who comes up with these names?), is a component that is less psychoactive than delta-9 THC and it also has neuroprotective properties. Backing it down from the last one, up next is Cannabidivarin, or CBDv, and it pretty much does what CBD does. Delta-8 THC is like delta-9 THC, however it is not as psychoactive. It is thought to have anti-anxiety and neuroprotective properties. Last but not least are THCa and CBDa. These are non psychotropic, active compounds that are effective antioxidant and anti-inflammatory components. They were discovered in raw cannabis.

Of course, cannabinoids and the human endocannabinoid system were mentioned in the “walk through time” as well, but the next section will explain them a little better.

What Is Cannabidiol and Cannabinoids?

CBD stands for cannabidiol. Cannabidiol is one of the many active compounds found in both cannabis and hemp. THC stands for delta-9 tetrahydrocannabinol (see why it was shortened to just three letters?) and is the psychoactive component in marijuana that is not found in large quantities in hemp. This is the component that can cause giddiness and euphoria (the high), among other effects. Cannabichromene, or CBC (good heavens! Glad they shorten them!), is non psychoactive and is thought to be an anti-fungal, anti-inflammatory, and anti depressant component. Cannabinol, or CBN, is believed to be an appetite stimulant, anti-asthmatic, antibiotic, sedative, and pain relieving component. Wow! It kind of makes you wonder who thinks up these names and if they get paid by the letter!

To continue, Cannabigerol, or CBG, is another component that is not psychoactive. It is an effective pain reliever, antibiotic, and anti-depressant. Moving on, Tetrahydrocannabivarin, thankfully shortened to THCv (seriously, who comes up with these names?), is a component that is less psychoactive than delta-9 THC and it also has neuroprotective properties. Backing it down from the last one, up next is Cannabidivarin, or CBDv, and it pretty much does what CBD does. Delta-8 THC is like delta-9 THC, however it is not as psychoactive. It is thought to have anti-anxiety and neuroprotective properties. Last but not least are THCa and CBDa. These are non psychotropic, active compounds that are effective antioxidant and anti-inflammatory components. They were discovered in raw cannabis.

Of course, cannabinoids and the human endocannabinoid system were mentioned in the “walk through time” as well, but the next section will explain them a little better.

What Are Phytocannabinoids and Endocannabinoids?

There are two types of cannabinoids, those produced by cannabis and those produced naturally by mammals. The ones found in cannabis are called phytocannabinoids and they imitate the ones found in mammals, which are called endocannabinoids. Having already walked you through the different phytocannabinoids (those very long words thrown at you in the previous few paragraphs), it is time to discuss endocannabinoids. This type is naturally produced in the bodies of mammals and, technically, are actually known as neurotransmitters. A more familiar example would be hormones, and there are many. They are produced by the nervous system depending on both the state of your health and certain outside influences. Receptors, which are found on every cell in the body, interact with these neurotransmitters. Basically, they tell the cells how to behave, even as far as how they respond to other neurotransmitters. Yes, this may get a bit confusing, so hang in there! Since the brain is not connected to every single cell in the body, but it is connected to the nervous system, a variety of sensors connected to the nervous system keep track of everything. The sensors send signals to the nervous system and the brain, and if something is out of whack, the nervous system sends out neurotransmitters through the blood to the cells to make some adjustments.

Moving on now, let’s discuss the human Endocannabinoid System (ECS). There are two components to the human ECS, the receptors on the cells and endocannabinoids made by the body that communicate with the cell’s receptors.

You may have heard of Seratonin, yet have no real idea of what it is, what it does, or how CBD affects it. Seratonin is one of the “feel good” molecules produced naturally by the body and is referred to as the “bliss molecule”. The level of seratonin in the body directly affects your mood. It is produced by Anandamide, which is one of the molecules that carry signals to the brain and the nervous system, as mentioned earlier. Seratonin is a neurotransmitter, and when its levels in your system are too low you may begin to suffer from anxiety and depression. CBD acts like anandamide, carrying messages to the brain, so using it raises the level of seratonin in your body. This relieves depression and anxiety, thus making CBD an effective treatment for those conditions. The endocannabinoids in our bodies help to regulate several functions such as mood, pain sensation, appetite and sleep. These substances bind to specific points of brain cells, called receptors, through which they influence the actions of serotonin. Seratonin levels improve mood and reduce stress. Serotonin also binds to its receptors in brain cells. When these substances bind to the receptors, they cause a series of events in each brain cell which stimulates processes that improve stress control and mood.

The ECS regulates many functions in your body, such as sleep patterns, appetite, moods and metabolism, which is why CBD is effective in treating so many seemingly unrelated conditions. In addition to all this, many cannabinoids are antioxidants. What that means is that they attach to the harmful molecules (free radicals) produced by your body, making them harmless.

What Are Phytocannabinoids and Endocannabinoids?

There are two types of cannabinoids, those produced by cannabis and those produced naturally by mammals. The ones found in cannabis are called phytocannabinoids and they imitate the ones found in mammals, which are called endocannabinoids. Having already walked you through the different phytocannabinoids (those very long words thrown at you in the previous few paragraphs), it is time to discuss endocannabinoids. This type is naturally produced in the bodies of mammals and, technically, are actually known as neurotransmitters. A more familiar example would be hormones, and there are many. They are produced by the nervous system depending on both the state of your health and certain outside influences. Receptors, which are found on every cell in the body, interact with these neurotransmitters. Basically, they tell the cells how to behave, even as far as how they respond to other neurotransmitters. Yes, this may get a bit confusing, so hang in there! Since the brain is not connected to every single cell in the body, but it is connected to the nervous system, a variety of sensors connected to the nervous system keep track of everything. The sensors send signals to the nervous system and the brain, and if something is out of whack, the nervous system sends out neurotransmitters through the blood to the cells to make some adjustments.

Moving on now, let’s discuss the human Endocannabinoid System (ECS). There are two components to the human ECS, the receptors on the cells and endocannabinoids made by the body that communicate with the cell’s receptors.

You may have heard of Seratonin, yet have no real idea of what it is, what it does, or how CBD affects it. Seratonin is one of the “feel good” molecules produced naturally by the body and is referred to as the “bliss molecule”. The level of seratonin in the body directly affects your mood. It is produced by Anandamide, which is one of the molecules that carry signals to the brain and the nervous system, as mentioned earlier. Seratonin is a neurotransmitter, and when its levels in your system are too low you may begin to suffer from anxiety and depression. CBD acts like anandamide, carrying messages to the brain, so using it raises the level of seratonin in your body. This relieves depression and anxiety, thus making CBD an effective treatment for those conditions. The endocannabinoids in our bodies help to regulate several functions such as mood, pain sensation, appetite and sleep. These substances bind to specific points of brain cells, called receptors, through which they influence the actions of serotonin. Seratonin levels improve mood and reduce stress. Serotonin also binds to its receptors in brain cells. When these substances bind to the receptors, they cause a series of events in each brain cell which stimulates processes that improve stress control and mood.

The ECS regulates many functions in your body, such as sleep patterns, appetite, moods and metabolism, which is why CBD is effective in treating so many seemingly unrelated conditions. In addition to all this, many cannabinoids are antioxidants. What that means is that they attach to the harmful molecules (free radicals) produced by your body, making them harmless.

What Exactly Are Terpenes?

Terpenes are another compound produced naturally in cannabis. Terpenes evaporate quickly in the air and are generally harmless. You may not even know they are there but for one thing, your nose. That’s right, terpenes are what cause things to have a noticeable odor and are what make aromatherapy an actual thing. One commonly sought terpenes is Linalool. This has a floral scent and is very strong in lavender. It is often used to aid in sleep, as well as for anxiety and psychosis as it has a calming effect. It is also an anti-inflammatory. Terpinolene is produced in conifers, citrus, lilac, marjoram, cumin and oregano and was used to help insomnia for centuries. It also contains antifungal and antibacterial properties. Myrcene can be found in hops, bay leaves, lemongrass, mango, eucalyptus, and a few more. It is good for pain, spasms, and insomnia and is used as an anti-inflammatory. Citronellol comes from geraniums, citrus plants, and roses. It works wonders as a repellent for various flying insects. It can also be used as an immune-regulating substance and as an anti-inflammatory.

Caryophyllene comes from cloves, black pepper, and basils and is used for its antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects. Pinene is found in orange peels and pine trees and has been used for hundreds of years for asthma and as an anti-inflammatory. Limonene is strongly citrus in its aroma and tastes bitter. It is used most commonly for gastric reflux, toenail fungus, anxiety and depression and for its immunostimulant effects. Humulene is also found in hops and smells a bit like beer! For hundreds of years it has been used as an appetite suppressant, an anti-inflammatory, and for its antibacterial properties. Camphene has a woodsy, earthy kind of smell and is found in ginger and camphor oils, both of which are therapeutic. Terpineol comes from flower blossoms, including lilacs, and has antioxidant and antibiotic properties in addition to relaxing and calming benefits.

Phellandrene is found in quite a few herbs and spices, as well as causing peppermint to smell like peppermint! Traditional Chinese medicine has used it to treat systemic fungal infections and digestive disorders. There are many more, but you get the general idea.

Have you ever tried to eat something that smelled bad by pinching your nose closed? Terpenes affect taste and smell in noticeable, sometimes physical, ways. Have you ever smelled something cooking and found yourself getting hungry? Or smelled something so foul it made your stomach heave? Those are some ways that terpenes physically affect your body. There are many different terpenes that offer various benefits to the body or mood, and some can even act like neurotransmitters and affect the seratonin levels in your body. Although all terpene molecules are quite similar, they each have their own unique flavor and scent. Various combinations of terpenes are responsible for the distinct aromas of cannabis strains. They are also known to impact how cannabinoids affect your body. Although their effect is not profound, as medicinal components they are quite valuable. Cannabinoids and terpenes working together are stronger and more effective than each one is separately.

This is called The Entourage Effect. Although research into the connection is ongoing, it is clear that terpenes and cannabis work very well together.

CBD has measurable effects on many of the systems and complex organs in the body. However, even with the decades, even centuries, of research into CBD there is still quite a lot to learn.

What Exactly Are Terpenes?

Terpenes are another compound produced naturally in cannabis. Terpenes evaporate quickly in the air and are generally harmless. You may not even know they are there but for one thing, your nose. That’s right, terpenes are what cause things to have a noticeable odor and are what make aromatherapy an actual thing. One commonly sought terpenes is Linalool. This has a floral scent and is very strong in lavender. It is often used to aid in sleep, as well as for anxiety and psychosis as it has a calming effect. It is also an anti-inflammatory. Terpinolene is produced in conifers, citrus, lilac, marjoram, cumin and oregano and was used to help insomnia for centuries. It also contains antifungal and antibacterial properties. Myrcene can be found in hops, bay leaves, lemongrass, mango, eucalyptus, and a few more. It is good for pain, spasms, and insomnia and is used as an anti-inflammatory. Citronellol comes from geraniums, citrus plants, and roses. It works wonders as a repellent for various flying insects. It can also be used as an immune-regulating substance and as an anti-inflammatory.

Caryophyllene comes from cloves, black pepper, and basils and is used for its antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects. Pinene is found in orange peels and pine trees and has been used for hundreds of years for asthma and as an anti-inflammatory. Limonene is strongly citrus in its aroma and tastes bitter. It is used most commonly for gastric reflux, toenail fungus, anxiety and depression and for its immunostimulant effects. Humulene is also found in hops and smells a bit like beer! For hundreds of years it has been used as an appetite suppressant, an anti-inflammatory, and for its antibacterial properties. Camphene has a woodsy, earthy kind of smell and is found in ginger and camphor oils, both of which are therapeutic. Terpineol comes from flower blossoms, including lilacs, and has antioxidant and antibiotic properties in addition to relaxing and calming benefits.

Phellandrene is found in quite a few herbs and spices, as well as causing peppermint to smell like peppermint! Traditional Chinese medicine has used it to treat systemic fungal infections and digestive disorders. There are many more, but you get the general idea.

Have you ever tried to eat something that smelled bad by pinching your nose closed? Terpenes affect taste and smell in noticeable, sometimes physical, ways. Have you ever smelled something cooking and found yourself getting hungry? Or smelled something so foul it made your stomach heave? Those are some ways that terpenes physically affect your body. There are many different terpenes that offer various benefits to the body or mood, and some can even act like neurotransmitters and affect the seratonin levels in your body. Although all terpene molecules are quite similar, they each have their own unique flavor and scent. Various combinations of terpenes are responsible for the distinct aromas of cannabis strains. They are also known to impact how cannabinoids affect your body. Although their effect is not profound, as medicinal components they are quite valuable. Cannabinoids and terpenes working together are stronger and more effective than each one is separately.

This is called The Entourage Effect. Although research into the connection is ongoing, it is clear that terpenes and cannabis work very well together.

CBD has measurable effects on many of the systems and complex organs in the body. However, even with the decades, even centuries, of research into CBD there is still quite a lot to learn.

CBD Research and Where It Started

Despite being illegal since the “reefer madness” meltdown in the 1930s, the early form of the DEA gave the University of Mississippi permission to grow marijuana for research in 1968. A report from the government’s Advisory Committee on Drug Dependence in the UK stated that long term, moderate use of cannabis was less harmful than amphetamines, opiates, barbituates, and alcohol, and was released that same year. In just two years, the U.S. made marijuana a Schedule 1 substance with no value medicinally and a high risk for abuse, and just two years after That, in 1972, the in depth study done by the Department of Health, Education, and Welfare suggested that marijuana be stripped of its Schedule 1 status and decriminalized. President Nixon said no.

In 1976, Robert Randall became the first legal medical cannabis patient, winning a lawsuit against the government. This lawsuit resulted in the National Institute on Drug Abuse supplying other patients with cannabis for “compassionate use” in 1978.

In 1990, Miles Herkenham, the Senior Investigator at the National Institute of Mental Health, discovered the human Endocannabinoid System. This discovery spawned a new wave of studies regarding cannabinoids. In 1992, endocannabinoids were discovered and Anandamine was identified. In 1993, with massive amounts of data before them, the American Medical Students Association lobbied for lawmakers to reduce cannabis to at least a Schedule 2 substance, but every attempt has been unsuccessful.

CBD Research and Where It Started

Despite being illegal since the “reefer madness” meltdown in the 1930s, the early form of the DEA gave the University of Mississippi permission to grow marijuana for research in 1968. A report from the government’s Advisory Committee on Drug Dependence in the UK stated that long term, moderate use of cannabis was less harmful than amphetamines, opiates, barbituates, and alcohol, and was released that same year. In just two years, the U.S. made marijuana a Schedule 1 substance with no value medicinally and a high risk for abuse, and just two years after That, in 1972, the in depth study done by the Department of Health, Education, and Welfare suggested that marijuana be stripped of its Schedule 1 status and decriminalized. President Nixon said no.

In 1976, Robert Randall became the first legal medical cannabis patient, winning a lawsuit against the government. This lawsuit resulted in the National Institute on Drug Abuse supplying other patients with cannabis for “compassionate use” in 1978.

In 1990, Miles Herkenham, the Senior Investigator at the National Institute of Mental Health, discovered the human Endocannabinoid System. This discovery spawned a new wave of studies regarding cannabinoids. In 1992, endocannabinoids were discovered and Anandamine was identified. In 1993, with massive amounts of data before them, the American Medical Students Association lobbied for lawmakers to reduce cannabis to at least a Schedule 2 substance, but every attempt has been unsuccessful.

CBD Research Studies

Many organizations, including the non profit Project CBD, continue research into the positive effects of CBD. Most of the available evidence makes it very clear: many conditions respond favorably to CBD.

The list of these conditions is truly staggering:

Acne
ADD/ADHD
Addiction
AIDS
ALS
Alzheimer’s
Anorexia
Antibiotic Resistance
Anxiety
Atherosclerosis
Arthritis
Asthma
Autism
Bi-polar disorder
Cancer
Digestive Issues
Depression
Diabetes
Endocrine Disorders
Epilepsy/Seizures
Fibromyalgia
Glaucoma
Heart Disease
Huntington’s Disease
Inflammation

IBS
Kidney Disease
Liver Disease
Metabolic Syndrome
Migraine
Mood Disorders
Motion Sickness
MS
Nausea
Neurodegeneration
Chronic Pain
Obesity
OCD
Osteoporosis
Parkinson’s Disease
Prion/Mad Cow Disease
PTSD
Rheumatism
Schizophrenia
Sickle Cell Anemia
Skin Conditions
Sleep Disorders
Spinal Cord Injury
Stress
Stroke and TBI

CBD Research Studies

Many organizations, including the non profit Project CBD, continue research into the positive effects of CBD. Most of the available evidence makes it very clear: many conditions respond favorably to CBD.

The list of these conditions is truly staggering:

Acne
ADD/ADHD
Addiction
AIDS
ALS
Alzheimer’s
Anorexia
Antibiotic Resistance
Anxiety
Atherosclerosis
Arthritis
Asthma
Autism
Bi-polar disorder
Cancer
Digestive Issues
Depression
Diabetes
Endocrine Disorders
Epilepsy/Seizures
Fibromyalgia
Glaucoma
Heart Disease
Huntington’s Disease
Inflammation

IBS
Kidney Disease
Liver Disease
Metabolic Syndrome
Migraine
Mood Disorders
Motion Sickness
MS
Nausea
Neurodegeneration
Chronic Pain
Obesity
OCD
Osteoporosis
Parkinson’s Disease
Prion/Mad Cow Disease
PTSD
Rheumatism
Schizophrenia
Sickle Cell Anemia
Skin Conditions
Sleep Disorders
Spinal Cord Injury
Stress
Stroke and TBI

CBD And How It Affects People With Mood Disorders

Mood disorders, of which there are many, have become the most common conditions treated with CBD. Many people suffer from different types of these disorders, preventing them from having anything close to what is considered “normal” or healthy relationships with other people. Depression is a mental disorder, or mood disorder, credited with very high morbidity and mortality rates. It is considered a major risk factor for impaired functionality, substance abuse, and suicide. It is characterized by a low mood, loss of emotional animation, and a slowing of thought and movements. Individuals suffering depression usually have a depressed mood, lack interest in activities they usually took interest in, sleep disorders, energy loss, and difficulty thinking or focusing. Discovery of the effects of different CBDs on the human ECS has been hugely successful, and as a result has brought relief to many.

Anxiety is a real condition caused by many factors. The symptoms can range from simple, perhaps slight nervousness in certain situations, to severe, preventing the sufferer from even engaging in what many consider “normal” daily activities. A Brazilian study on the effects of CBD on anxiety was published in 2009 in The British Journal of Pharmacology.

Research shows that CBD has a powerful component called Anti-axiolytic.

This component prevents the receptors in your brain from succumbing to anxiety. In many cases, people suffering from an anxiety disorder are given some type of pharmaceutical medication. Depending on the symptoms the person is experiencing, those pharmaceuticals can cause even more damage. It has been shown that, over time and with continued use, the receptors in the brain and nervous system become so accustomed to the chemicals that they cease to have a positive effect. The patient then “needs” to take more and more of the substance to achieve any positive effect. This is counter productive for several reasons, the main one being that if something is Not working you need to try something else.

That is not generally what happens, however. When your system becomes dependent on a substance, it needs a steady supply of that substance to continue to function. That is one factor of addiction. Additionally, your brain believes it is helping even when it is not, which is another factor of addiction. Patients take the pharmaceuticals prescribed by their doctors and their bodies and brains become conditioned to the substance, after which more and more of the substance is needed. This does not happen with either CBDs or THC. Although, with THC, your brain may “enjoy” the effects, it does not become dependent on it to function.

CBD And How It Affects People With Mood Disorders

Mood disorders, of which there are many, have become the most common conditions treated with CBD. Many people suffer from different types of these disorders, preventing them from having anything close to what is considered “normal” or healthy relationships with other people. Depression is a mental disorder, or mood disorder, credited with very high morbidity and mortality rates. It is considered a major risk factor for impaired functionality, substance abuse, and suicide. It is characterized by a low mood, loss of emotional animation, and a slowing of thought and movements. Individuals suffering depression usually have a depressed mood, lack interest in activities they usually took interest in, sleep disorders, energy loss, and difficulty thinking or focusing. Discovery of the effects of different CBDs on the human ECS has been hugely successful, and as a result has brought relief to many.

Anxiety is a real condition caused by many factors. The symptoms can range from simple, perhaps slight nervousness in certain situations, to severe, preventing the sufferer from even engaging in what many consider “normal” daily activities. A Brazilian study on the effects of CBD on anxiety was published in 2009 in The British Journal of Pharmacology.

Research shows that CBD has a powerful component called Anti-axiolytic.

This component prevents the receptors in your brain from succumbing to anxiety. In many cases, people suffering from an anxiety disorder are given some type of pharmaceutical medication. Depending on the symptoms the person is experiencing, those pharmaceuticals can cause even more damage. It has been shown that, over time and with continued use, the receptors in the brain and nervous system become so accustomed to the chemicals that they cease to have a positive effect. The patient then “needs” to take more and more of the substance to achieve any positive effect. This is counter productive for several reasons, the main one being that if something is Not working you need to try something else.

That is not generally what happens, however. When your system becomes dependent on a substance, it needs a steady supply of that substance to continue to function. That is one factor of addiction. Additionally, your brain believes it is helping even when it is not, which is another factor of addiction. Patients take the pharmaceuticals prescribed by their doctors and their bodies and brains become conditioned to the substance, after which more and more of the substance is needed. This does not happen with either CBDs or THC. Although, with THC, your brain may “enjoy” the effects, it does not become dependent on it to function.

CBD and PTSD

Another study conducted by Brazilian and UK researchers was published in the December 2016 issue of Frontiers in Pharmacology and showed that CBD was effective in negating fear conditioning. Fear conditioning is what some sufferers of PTSD have experienced, like soldiers in combat or people who have experienced severe or even moderate abuse in their lives. Although those two causes are vastly different, the conditioning to fear is very similar.

For example, someone who has been shot at may re-experience the trauma of that when they hear something that even sounds like a gun shot. Someone who has experienced abuse may react in a negative way to someone screaming at them or raising a hand or a weapon to them. Even if the threat is merely perceived, their conditioning on these “triggers” is profound enough to cause them renewed trauma. The effectiveness of CBDs on this condition is a fantastic discovery, and has made huge strides in the treatment of PTSD (Post Traumatic Stress Disorder).

CBD and PTSD

Another study conducted by Brazilian and UK researchers was published in the December 2016 issue of Frontiers in Pharmacology and showed that CBD was effective in negating fear conditioning. Fear conditioning is what some sufferers of PTSD have experienced, like soldiers in combat or people who have experienced severe or even moderate abuse in their lives. Although those two causes are vastly different, the conditioning to fear is very similar.

For example, someone who has been shot at may re-experience the trauma of that when they hear something that even sounds like a gun shot. Someone who has experienced abuse may react in a negative way to someone screaming at them or raising a hand or a weapon to them. Even if the threat is merely perceived, their conditioning on these “triggers” is profound enough to cause them renewed trauma. The effectiveness of CBDs on this condition is a fantastic discovery, and has made huge strides in the treatment of PTSD (Post Traumatic Stress Disorder).

CBD and How It Treats Sleep Disorders

Of course, regular sleep cycles are very important for overall physical and mental health. The human body counts on circadian rhythms (daily rhythms). Our brains determine tell a cell what to do and when and our nervous system and endocrine system work to keep our cells on schedule. Signaling molecules like cannabinoids are released during the day to adjust metabolism, among other activities.

Research shows that CBD may help balance circadian rhythms.

In fact, many people who use CBD claim that they not only sleep better at night, but also have more energy and alertness during the day. “Effectiveness of Cannabidiol Oil for Pediatric Anxiety and Insomnia as Part of Post Traumatic Stress Disorder: A Case Report,” was authored by researchers at the University of Colorado School of Medicine and the Wholeness Center and was published in The Permanente Journal.

Their research showed that while pharmaceutical treatment provided minimal, and temporary, relief for these conditions, the side effects were severe. Conversely, treatment with CBD saw a steady decrease in anxiety symptoms while increasing both the quality and quantity of sleep for the subjects. Many people have found that using CBD helps them sleep better.

Additionally, they are more alert and have more energy while awake. “Cannabidiol in Humans-The Quest for Therapeutic Targets”, a review that was published in the Current Psychiatry Journal, clearly posits that people suffering from sleep disorders and use CBD have increased instances of restful sleep.

CBD and How It Treats Sleep Disorders

Of course, regular sleep cycles are very important for overall physical and mental health. The human body counts on circadian rhythms (daily rhythms). Our brains determine tell a cell what to do and when and our nervous system and endocrine system work to keep our cells on schedule. Signaling molecules like cannabinoids are released during the day to adjust metabolism, among other activities.

Research shows that CBD may help balance circadian rhythms.

In fact, many people who use CBD claim that they not only sleep better at night, but also have more energy and alertness during the day. “Effectiveness of Cannabidiol Oil for Pediatric Anxiety and Insomnia as Part of Post Traumatic Stress Disorder: A Case Report,” was authored by researchers at the University of Colorado School of Medicine and the Wholeness Center and was published in The Permanente Journal.

Their research showed that while pharmaceutical treatment provided minimal, and temporary, relief for these conditions, the side effects were severe. Conversely, treatment with CBD saw a steady decrease in anxiety symptoms while increasing both the quality and quantity of sleep for the subjects. Many people have found that using CBD helps them sleep better.

Additionally, they are more alert and have more energy while awake. “Cannabidiol in Humans-The Quest for Therapeutic Targets”, a review that was published in the Current Psychiatry Journal, clearly posits that people suffering from sleep disorders and use CBD have increased instances of restful sleep.

CBD and How It Treats Epilepsy

Upon the completion of clinical trials, Intractable Epilepsy was added to the list of conditions treatable with CBD. Epilepsy has many negative effects on the body, including uncontrollable instances of violent shaking, sometimes called “spells” or seizures. During these seizures, the sufferer runs the risk of choking or even biting off their own tongue.

In the past, various types of epilepsy have been treated with many pharmaceuticals, including barbituates. Phenobarbitol, one such barbituate, can cause the patient to be in a nearly catatonic state in the hopes of reducing the likelihood and occurrence of a life threatening seizure. CBD products have been found to reduce these seizures without exposing the sufferer to near catatonia or any of the other harmful side effects caused by most pharmaceuticals.

CBD and How It Treats Epilepsy

Upon the completion of clinical trials, Intractable Epilepsy was added to the list of conditions treatable with CBD. Epilepsy has many negative effects on the body, including uncontrollable instances of violent shaking, sometimes called “spells” or seizures. During these seizures, the sufferer runs the risk of choking or even biting off their own tongue.

In the past, various types of epilepsy have been treated with many pharmaceuticals, including barbituates. Phenobarbitol, one such barbituate, can cause the patient to be in a nearly catatonic state in the hopes of reducing the likelihood and occurrence of a life threatening seizure. CBD products have been found to reduce these seizures without exposing the sufferer to near catatonia or any of the other harmful side effects caused by most pharmaceuticals.

CBD and How It Affects Cancer

Cancer is also on the list of treatable conditions for a few reasons. Cancer can develop in anyone due to a combination of genetic and environmental (outside the natural body systems) factors. Is CBD oil an effective treatment for cancer? Yes. It is. Not only CBD products, but THC as well. This is not only because it eases the side effects caused by the various chemical treatments used to combat many types of cancer, although that is a major benefit for those patients. CBD and THC proactively fight cancer cells in the body.

It has been shown that when THC makes contact with the CB1 or CB2 cannabinoid receptors on the cancer cells, it causes an increase in something called ceramide synthesis, which causes cell death. Normal cells do not have this reaction to THC, only cancer cells do.

The cancer cells do not die because of exposure to cytotoxic chemicals, they die when there is a change in the mitochondria, which is a producer of energy in cells. As the ceramide production increases, the sphingolipid rheostat is turned up, which causes the mitochondrial membrane to become more receptive to something called cytochrome C, a vital protein for producing cell energy.

This process pushes the cytochrome C out of the mitochondria, killing the cancer cell’s source of energy. The ceramide in the cell just leaves the cell with no chance of survival. The absolute key to killing these cells is the amount of ceramide in the body’s system. Basically, any amount of CBD or THC taken in steadily over time keeps metabolic pressure on cancer cells, causing the death of these cells.

CBD and How It Affects Cancer

Cancer is also on the list of treatable conditions for a few reasons. Cancer can develop in anyone due to a combination of genetic and environmental (outside the natural body systems) factors. Is CBD oil an effective treatment for cancer? Yes. It is. Not only CBD products, but THC as well. This is not only because it eases the side effects caused by the various chemical treatments used to combat many types of cancer, although that is a major benefit for those patients. CBD and THC proactively fight cancer cells in the body.

It has been shown that when THC makes contact with the CB1 or CB2 cannabinoid receptors on the cancer cells, it causes an increase in something called ceramide synthesis, which causes cell death. Normal cells do not have this reaction to THC, only cancer cells do.

The cancer cells do not die because of exposure to cytotoxic chemicals, they die when there is a change in the mitochondria, which is a producer of energy in cells. As the ceramide production increases, the sphingolipid rheostat is turned up, which causes the mitochondrial membrane to become more receptive to something called cytochrome C, a vital protein for producing cell energy.

This process pushes the cytochrome C out of the mitochondria, killing the cancer cell’s source of energy. The ceramide in the cell just leaves the cell with no chance of survival. The absolute key to killing these cells is the amount of ceramide in the body’s system. Basically, any amount of CBD or THC taken in steadily over time keeps metabolic pressure on cancer cells, causing the death of these cells.

Federal Studies of CBD

In mid June 2018, the DVA (Department of Veteran’s Affairs) was prohibited by the federal government from interfering with U.S. veterans participating in legally sanctioned cannabis programs. This decision reversed a directive that allowed the DVA to prevent its doctors from assisting veterans in getting access to medical cannabis, and even allowed those doctors to deny services to veterans who were using medical cannabis. The DVA is now instructed to conduct cannabis research, including whole plant, extracts, and CBD oil in the studies.

Federal Studies of CBD

In mid June 2018, the DVA (Department of Veteran’s Affairs) was prohibited by the federal government from interfering with U.S. veterans participating in legally sanctioned cannabis programs. This decision reversed a directive that allowed the DVA to prevent its doctors from assisting veterans in getting access to medical cannabis, and even allowed those doctors to deny services to veterans who were using medical cannabis. The DVA is now instructed to conduct cannabis research, including whole plant, extracts, and CBD oil in the studies.

What’s The Right Dosage And Administration Of CBD?

Again, no two people are exactly alike, so arriving at a dosage for CBD has been challenging. Additionally, how you consume it, what ingredients are used, and the percentage of the dose that actually hits your bloodstream for your body’s use (Bioavailability) are also factors. For example, you would have 100 percent bioavailability of CBD only if you inject it directly into a vein. Any other method will mean you only get some of the CBD for a variety of reasons.

Always Start Slow

To determine the proper CBD oil dosage for you, you need to take many things into account. Why you are using it matters as much in determining dosage as the type of product and the method of administering it. Start slow and keep a record of what effects you feel, how long it took to take effect, how long it was before you needed more, etc. Keep accurate records to give you an idea of whether to use more or less and how effective the method and product were. If you have never used CBD before, you should begin with a low concentration, like 1 mg of CBD to every 20 pounds of your actual body weight. Also, make sure you only use one method at a time. The effects and time frames will be different for each method and you may throw off your ECS balance by mixing things up. To ensure that the CBD product you choose will not effect your day in a negative way, you should try it for the first time around bed time. While it is unlikely that a low dose of CBD will knock you out, it is better to be safe than sorry. Once you know how it effects you, you will be able to use it throughout the day with only positive results.

If the lower dosage is not providing the desired effect, (keep in mind that you will not feel high), you should not dramatically increase your dose, rather you should proceed slowly. Remember to keep accurate records of your dosage and its effects so you know how effective each dosage amount is.

Naturally, for any medical condition diagnosed by a physician, you should always follow that person’s recommendations regarding dosage. In the event that the recommended dose is not effective, your physician can suggest the appropriate changes. Of course, taking an excess of any substance can cause negative effects, even CBD products. However, CBD is no toxic so there is no real risk of overdose. You may become too relaxed for some activities if you take too much at once but it will not kill you.

Your lifestyle is an important factor to consider, as well as the condition you are treating and the wait time for effect, when choosing the method of delivery and the type of product you will use. Another important factor will be the type of product itself. Things to consider when choosing the type will be convenience, how well it travels, maybe even which type you would enjoy more. Capsules, tinctures, and topicals are best for travel, while inhalation methods are more suited to at home use.

What’s The Right Dosage And Administration Of CBD?

Again, no two people are exactly alike, so arriving at a dosage for CBD has been challenging. Additionally, how you consume it, what ingredients are used, and the percentage of the dose that actually hits your bloodstream for your body’s use (Bioavailability) are also factors. For example, you would have 100 percent bioavailability of CBD only if you inject it directly into a vein. Any other method will mean you only get some of the CBD for a variety of reasons.

Always Start Slow

To determine the proper CBD oil dosage for you, you need to take many things into account. Why you are using it matters as much in determining dosage as the type of product and the method of administering it. Start slow and keep a record of what effects you feel, how long it took to take effect, how long it was before you needed more, etc. Keep accurate records to give you an idea of whether to use more or less and how effective the method and product were. If you have never used CBD before, you should begin with a low concentration, like 1 mg of CBD to every 20 pounds of your actual body weight. Also, make sure you only use one method at a time. The effects and time frames will be different for each method and you may throw off your ECS balance by mixing things up. To ensure that the CBD product you choose will not effect your day in a negative way, you should try it for the first time around bed time. While it is unlikely that a low dose of CBD will knock you out, it is better to be safe than sorry. Once you know how it effects you, you will be able to use it throughout the day with only positive results.

If the lower dosage is not providing the desired effect, (keep in mind that you will not feel high), you should not dramatically increase your dose, rather you should proceed slowly. Remember to keep accurate records of your dosage and its effects so you know how effective each dosage amount is.

Naturally, for any medical condition diagnosed by a physician, you should always follow that person’s recommendations regarding dosage. In the event that the recommended dose is not effective, your physician can suggest the appropriate changes. Of course, taking an excess of any substance can cause negative effects, even CBD products. However, CBD is no toxic so there is no real risk of overdose. You may become too relaxed for some activities if you take too much at once but it will not kill you.

Your lifestyle is an important factor to consider, as well as the condition you are treating and the wait time for effect, when choosing the method of delivery and the type of product you will use. Another important factor will be the type of product itself. Things to consider when choosing the type will be convenience, how well it travels, maybe even which type you would enjoy more. Capsules, tinctures, and topicals are best for travel, while inhalation methods are more suited to at home use.

Bioavailability Of CBD Oil Tinctures

Tinctures are the third highest method, and could potentially have a bioavailability of between 10 and 40 percent. Tinctures are liquid and would be administered via small drops under the tongue. The two types of tinctures are oil based and alcohol based and both can be administered in the same way. Don’t be alarmed, the alcohol will not harm you, and will have a slightly faster time frame and a somewhat higher bioavailability percentage. The reason, of course, is that blood is water based and oil does not mix well with water. That does not mean that alcohol based tinctures are better, however. In fact, you generally get a fuller compound spectrum with the oil based tinctures. These products usually come in a small dropper bottle, although some are in larger bottles and you administer the product with a spoon, like cough syrup.

Tinctures can be administered throughout the day, as needed. They travel well, are easy to administer, and have a faster time frame, which makes them ideal for those suffering anxiety and similar conditions.

Bioavailability Of CBD Oil Tinctures

Tinctures are the third highest method, and could potentially have a bioavailability of between 10 and 40 percent. Tinctures are liquid and would be administered via small drops under the tongue. The two types of tinctures are oil based and alcohol based and both can be administered in the same way. Don’t be alarmed, the alcohol will not harm you, and will have a slightly faster time frame and a somewhat higher bioavailability percentage. The reason, of course, is that blood is water based and oil does not mix well with water. That does not mean that alcohol based tinctures are better, however. In fact, you generally get a fuller compound spectrum with the oil based tinctures. These products usually come in a small dropper bottle, although some are in larger bottles and you administer the product with a spoon, like cough syrup.

Tinctures can be administered throughout the day, as needed. They travel well, are easy to administer, and have a faster time frame, which makes them ideal for those suffering anxiety and similar conditions.

Bioavailability of CBD Capsules

Capsules made with CBD oil are another viable option. Some you may need to puncture to apply to the skin, but most often you will just have to swallow them. The capsules are usually made with a type of gelatin that melts very quickly and is absorbed by your stomach, which gives you the whole dose of CBD. This method is great for certain stomach ailments as very little of the CBD will be passed through your system and out.

However, this method takes a little longer to affect you because it takes time to get to your stomach so it can begin to work.

Bioavailability of CBD Capsules

Capsules made with CBD oil are another viable option. Some you may need to puncture to apply to the skin, but most often you will just have to swallow them. The capsules are usually made with a type of gelatin that melts very quickly and is absorbed by your stomach, which gives you the whole dose of CBD. This method is great for certain stomach ailments as very little of the CBD will be passed through your system and out.

However, this method takes a little longer to affect you because it takes time to get to your stomach so it can begin to work.

Bioavailability of Topical Creams/Balms/Salves

CBD infused creams, lotions, balms, oils and salves are called Topicals. These products are commonly made with other helpful ingredients that enhance the therapeutic effects. This includes collagen, vitamin E, aloe, moisturizers, and many others. You can also apply regular CBD oil directly to the skin for similar effect. Mixing a drop or two of your preferred CBD oil into your bathwater, massage oil, or with a lotion or cream you already use is another alternative. Topicals are very effective on specific patches of skin as well as on the muscles and joints beneath the skin.

The time it takes to feel the effects of the CBD product depends on a variety of factors. The main factor is your system. Your weight, age, metabolism, health, and circulation all determine how quickly you will begin to feel the effects of your product. This goes back to your ECS and how many active receptors you have. Other factors are the type of product you choose to use, how you administer it, and how much you use.

For instance, the effects of edibles will take longer to hit you than those of a tincture because you have to partially digest the before they enter your bloodstream. Inhaling CBD gives you the effect almost immediately, but edibles can take from 20 minutes to an hour, depending on your metabolism, before the effects are felt. Tinctures may take as long as 20 minutes to begin to work, but usually it is much faster. Of course, as every person is different, these times will vary.

Bioavailability of Topical Creams/Balms/Salves

CBD infused creams, lotions, balms, oils and salves are called Topicals. These products are commonly made with other helpful ingredients that enhance the therapeutic effects. This includes collagen, vitamin E, aloe, moisturizers, and many others. You can also apply regular CBD oil directly to the skin for similar effect. Mixing a drop or two of your preferred CBD oil into your bathwater, massage oil, or with a lotion or cream you already use is another alternative. Topicals are very effective on specific patches of skin as well as on the muscles and joints beneath the skin.

The time it takes to feel the effects of the CBD product depends on a variety of factors. The main factor is your system. Your weight, age, metabolism, health, and circulation all determine how quickly you will begin to feel the effects of your product. This goes back to your ECS and how many active receptors you have. Other factors are the type of product you choose to use, how you administer it, and how much you use.

For instance, the effects of edibles will take longer to hit you than those of a tincture because you have to partially digest the before they enter your bloodstream. Inhaling CBD gives you the effect almost immediately, but edibles can take from 20 minutes to an hour, depending on your metabolism, before the effects are felt. Tinctures may take as long as 20 minutes to begin to work, but usually it is much faster. Of course, as every person is different, these times will vary.

Bioavailability of CBD Vape

The method that provides the second highest bioavailability percentage is inhalation. When you vaporize or atomize CBD and inhale it, it goes straight into your lungs and directly into your bloodstream, like oxygen. Using a nebulizer to receive an exact dose is the best way. For at home use it is the best option. Most people prefer the convenience of a pocket vaporizer or Vape Pen. This is a less exact dose of product, however, as they are not really designed with an exact amount in mind. This method affects you almost immediately and provides a bioavailability of between 25 and 60 percent. The bioavailability depends largely on several factors, such as the ingredients used, how much you inhale at one time, and how long you hold in the vapor. Some components added to the inhalation products, like polyethylene glycol (PEG), may be harmful.

Although all these methods are FDA approved, PEG is what they use in coolants and anti-freeze products, like for your car. Its probably not really good to vaporize and inhale that stuff, really.

Bioavailability of CBD Vape

The method that provides the second highest bioavailability percentage is inhalation. When you vaporize or atomize CBD and inhale it, it goes straight into your lungs and directly into your bloodstream, like oxygen. Using a nebulizer to receive an exact dose is the best way. For at home use it is the best option. Most people prefer the convenience of a pocket vaporizer or Vape Pen. This is a less exact dose of product, however, as they are not really designed with an exact amount in mind. This method affects you almost immediately and provides a bioavailability of between 25 and 60 percent. The bioavailability depends largely on several factors, such as the ingredients used, how much you inhale at one time, and how long you hold in the vapor. Some components added to the inhalation products, like polyethylene glycol (PEG), may be harmful.

Although all these methods are FDA approved, PEG is what they use in coolants and anti-freeze products, like for your car. Its probably not really good to vaporize and inhale that stuff, really.

Stick With a Quality CBD Supplier

You need to be very careful when choosing what to buy, and you also need to be careful where you buy it. The market for CBD has grown with incredible speed, spawning both good companies, and bad ones. Many unscrupulous businesses will cut corners by making inferior products in an effort to make more money off the unsuspecting general public. Their products may contain harmful compounds, be extracted using unsafe methods, and may even contain synthetic CBD or no CBD at all.

CBD products are not something you want to take chances with. A recent survey revealed that fully 40 percent of products available do not have the amount of CBD stated on the labels. The market has been flooded with both the good and the bad.

You need to be sure you buy from a trustworthy source, such as Lively Owl.

One way you can identify a good company is to do some fact checking. If the company has a website, look around it to see if they state where they get their ingredients, the methods they use for extraction, their level of technology, and the quality of any additional compounds the may use. Thankfully, most notable companies will not only proudly display this information, they generally inundate you with far more information than you really need. In some cases, they list contact details and will gladly answer any additional questions you may have. If those sources are not available, or the representatives do not respond to your queries, you can safely assume they are not “above board”and continue your search elsewhere.

When checking the source of the hemp used, what you want to look for is if they use PCR hemp. This type has been cultivated specifically for medicinal use and is rich in terpenes and cannabinoids. The U.S. produces some of the finest quality of cannabis and hemp that you can find. If the company states that they make their products using industrial grade hemp, you can assume it is not high quality and may in fact be harmful.

Stick With a Quality CBD Supplier

You need to be very careful when choosing what to buy, and you also need to be careful where you buy it. The market for CBD has grown with incredible speed, spawning both good companies, and bad ones. Many unscrupulous businesses will cut corners by making inferior products in an effort to make more money off the unsuspecting general public. Their products may contain harmful compounds, be extracted using unsafe methods, and may even contain synthetic CBD or no CBD at all.

CBD products are not something you want to take chances with. A recent survey revealed that fully 40 percent of products available do not have the amount of CBD stated on the labels. The market has been flooded with both the good and the bad.

You need to be sure you buy from a trustworthy source, such as Lively Owl.

One way you can identify a good company is to do some fact checking. If the company has a website, look around it to see if they state where they get their ingredients, the methods they use for extraction, their level of technology, and the quality of any additional compounds the may use. Thankfully, most notable companies will not only proudly display this information, they generally inundate you with far more information than you really need. In some cases, they list contact details and will gladly answer any additional questions you may have. If those sources are not available, or the representatives do not respond to your queries, you can safely assume they are not “above board”and continue your search elsewhere.

When checking the source of the hemp used, what you want to look for is if they use PCR hemp. This type has been cultivated specifically for medicinal use and is rich in terpenes and cannabinoids. The U.S. produces some of the finest quality of cannabis and hemp that you can find. If the company states that they make their products using industrial grade hemp, you can assume it is not high quality and may in fact be harmful.

Not All Hemp Is Created Equal

Hemp is farmed all over the world. The U.S. has only just started to rebuild its hemp industry after years of prohibition. You must understand that not all hemp is equal. Industrial hemp is grown mostly for its seeds and fibers will not produce much cannabinoids and terpenes. In order for a CBD product which is made from industrial hemp to contain the same concentrations of cannabinoids and terpenes as CBD oil made from PCR hemp, industrial hemp CBD is refined, possibly removing or destroying many of the beneficial compounds. If a manufacturer states that their CBD was extracted from industrial hemp, you can assume that the product is probably either lower in CBD and terpenes than one made with PCR hemp, or has been over processed and has less of its natural essence. Finding a company that uses PCR hemp is your best bet. The lowest quality products are usually made in Asian countries, like China, where quality standards are not high.

They are often made from strains of industrial hemp which are cannabinoids and terpenes poor. They are often extracted using substandard methods that can actually destroy cannabinoids and terpenes. They may also contain toxic pesticides illegal in the U.S., or even be contaminated with biological toxins or mold.

Lively Owl manufactures all products in the US and ensure the highest manufacturing standards and quality. You can view our store here.

Check The Ingredients

Many CBD oil products do contain other ingredients, such as essential oils or even vegetable oils. You want to check the list of ingredients in the product you mean to buy. If you see a name you don’t recognize, look it up. Many oils, including coconut and almond oil, are non toxic and therefore harmless unless you have a specific allergy. MCT oil, although it has a crazy long name, is quite harmless and very easy for the body to process.

Not All Hemp Is Created Equal

Hemp is farmed all over the world. The U.S. has only just started to rebuild its hemp industry after years of prohibition. You must understand that not all hemp is equal. Industrial hemp is grown mostly for its seeds and fibers will not produce much cannabinoids and terpenes. In order for a CBD product which is made from industrial hemp to contain the same concentrations of cannabinoids and terpenes as CBD oil made from PCR hemp, industrial hemp CBD is refined, possibly removing or destroying many of the beneficial compounds. If a manufacturer states that their CBD was extracted from industrial hemp, you can assume that the product is probably either lower in CBD and terpenes than one made with PCR hemp, or has been over processed and has less of its natural essence. Finding a company that uses PCR hemp is your best bet. The lowest quality products are usually made in Asian countries, like China, where quality standards are not high.

They are often made from strains of industrial hemp which are cannabinoids and terpenes poor. They are often extracted using substandard methods that can actually destroy cannabinoids and terpenes. They may also contain toxic pesticides illegal in the U.S., or even be contaminated with biological toxins or mold.

Lively Owl manufactures all products in the US and ensure the highest manufacturing standards and quality. You can view our store here.

Check The Ingredients

Many CBD oil products do contain other ingredients, such as essential oils or even vegetable oils. You want to check the list of ingredients in the product you mean to buy. If you see a name you don’t recognize, look it up. Many oils, including coconut and almond oil, are non toxic and therefore harmless unless you have a specific allergy. MCT oil, although it has a crazy long name, is quite harmless and very easy for the body to process.

Lab Results Are Important

You also want to look at their quality testing methods. Reputable manufacturers will not cut corners, even in testing, and will often have their products sent out to a third party ensure quality. They should be able accurately state the amount of CBD found in their products as well as the quality of the CBD. However, if a company makes health claims about their product, avoid them like the plague. The FDA has restricted companies from making such claims without approved testing, so if a manufacturer does that do not buy from them. They obviously do not know what they are doing. Finally, Never buy synthetic CBD products! They are extremely dangerous.

As you have seen, CBD oil, the research into it and the use of it is very complex and sometimes confusing. One thing you can be certain of is that it is not the “evil” substance it has been painted as over the years. Neither is cannabis, for that matter. Whether you believe it was “Big Pharma” or corrupt businessmen who are to blame for these two substances being vilified through recent history is irrelevant. The big picture here is that many people have been forced to suffer needlessly as a result.

Lab Results Are Important

You also want to look at their quality testing methods. Reputable manufacturers will not cut corners, even in testing, and will often have their products sent out to a third party ensure quality. They should be able accurately state the amount of CBD found in their products as well as the quality of the CBD. However, if a company makes health claims about their product, avoid them like the plague. The FDA has restricted companies from making such claims without approved testing, so if a manufacturer does that do not buy from them. They obviously do not know what they are doing. Finally, Never buy synthetic CBD products! They are extremely dangerous.

As you have seen, CBD oil, the research into it and the use of it is very complex and sometimes confusing. One thing you can be certain of is that it is not the “evil” substance it has been painted as over the years. Neither is cannabis, for that matter. Whether you believe it was “Big Pharma” or corrupt businessmen who are to blame for these two substances being vilified through recent history is irrelevant. The big picture here is that many people have been forced to suffer needlessly as a result.

CBD and Its Effects On Opioids

Addiction to opioids is currently a national crisis, as is the death toll resulting from people over dosing on those harmful substances. Methadone is a synthetic opioid that has been used in the treatment of opioid addiction, with some success.

It has shown that it can prevent the symptoms of withdrawal that people experience when they have used too much of a substance for too long. It is also supposed to negate the effectiveness of actual opioids, rendering them useless in effect. The problem is that many people then become addicted to methadone. The use of methadone treatment is promoted in an attempt to reduce the number of deaths by over dose. In 2017 alone, studies show that there were over 70,000 American citizens who died as a result of drug overdose. Conversely, there has not been even one reported case of anyone dying as a direct result of taking or using either CBD or THC.

Some people have tried to put forth that people can have died as a result of being “high” while engaging in dangerous activities, but even in cases where that may have some veracity, it is not common and proof of this cannot be found. Also, the same case can be made against many other substances, especially alcohol and opioids, and with substantially more corroborating evidence. Quite simply, neither CBD nor THC will kill you, no matter how much of it you use.

CBD vs. Big Pharma

Holistic alternatives to modern pharmaceuticals have begun to regain the ground they have lost over the last century. Before there were drug stores on every corner people turned to natural remedies to cure what ailed them. Willow bark could ease a headache, chamomile would settle an upset stomach, raspberry leaves would ease the trials of delivering a baby, the list goes on and on.

As the lives of the general public became busier and more hectic, they stopped wanting the hassle of growing or searching for herbs or plants that would make them feel better. They also stopped teaching their children about these remedies because they no longer had to. They could go to a drugstore and buy aspirin (originally derived from willow) to cure a headache. They could get cough syrup for their cough rather than brew a tea of mint leaves. They could settle their nerves with a prescription for Valium, rather than dig up valerian root and deal with its horrible smell (terpenes in action).

There seemed to be something they could buy for every possible issue they might have so why bother doing things the hard way? They were just too busy, and who cares what is in it as long as it works. Besides, they wouldn’t sell it if it will hurt you, right? Sure, there are a lot of medicines out there that really do help, like Penicillin (unless you are allergic), vaccines, and many, many more. It is doubtful that eating moldy bread (penicillin is derived from mold) would be a particularly beneficial activity. It is very harmful to just go out and use herbs if you do not know what you are doing. Many plants can harm you, even kill you, so if you plan to become an herbalist make sure you study!

CBD and Its Effects On Opioids

Addiction to opioids is currently a national crisis, as is the death toll resulting from people over dosing on those harmful substances. Methadone is a synthetic opioid that has been used in the treatment of opioid addiction, with some success.

It has shown that it can prevent the symptoms of withdrawal that people experience when they have used too much of a substance for too long. It is also supposed to negate the effectiveness of actual opioids, rendering them useless in effect. The problem is that many people then become addicted to methadone. The use of methadone treatment is promoted in an attempt to reduce the number of deaths by over dose. In 2017 alone, studies show that there were over 70,000 American citizens who died as a result of drug overdose. Conversely, there has not been even one reported case of anyone dying as a direct result of taking or using either CBD or THC.

Some people have tried to put forth that people can have died as a result of being “high” while engaging in dangerous activities, but even in cases where that may have some veracity, it is not common and proof of this cannot be found. Also, the same case can be made against many other substances, especially alcohol and opioids, and with substantially more corroborating evidence. Quite simply, neither CBD nor THC will kill you, no matter how much of it you use.

CBD vs. Big Pharma

Holistic alternatives to modern pharmaceuticals have begun to regain the ground they have lost over the last century. Before there were drug stores on every corner people turned to natural remedies to cure what ailed them. Willow bark could ease a headache, chamomile would settle an upset stomach, raspberry leaves would ease the trials of delivering a baby, the list goes on and on.

As the lives of the general public became busier and more hectic, they stopped wanting the hassle of growing or searching for herbs or plants that would make them feel better. They also stopped teaching their children about these remedies because they no longer had to. They could go to a drugstore and buy aspirin (originally derived from willow) to cure a headache. They could get cough syrup for their cough rather than brew a tea of mint leaves. They could settle their nerves with a prescription for Valium, rather than dig up valerian root and deal with its horrible smell (terpenes in action).

There seemed to be something they could buy for every possible issue they might have so why bother doing things the hard way? They were just too busy, and who cares what is in it as long as it works. Besides, they wouldn’t sell it if it will hurt you, right? Sure, there are a lot of medicines out there that really do help, like Penicillin (unless you are allergic), vaccines, and many, many more. It is doubtful that eating moldy bread (penicillin is derived from mold) would be a particularly beneficial activity. It is very harmful to just go out and use herbs if you do not know what you are doing. Many plants can harm you, even kill you, so if you plan to become an herbalist make sure you study!

Here are a few points for you to remember.

Once you find a good, trustworthy company, stick with them. You cannot be too careful. A quick search on the internet will provide you with a good place to start. Talk to your physician. You may get a few leads on reputable companies and advice on dosage. Do not be afraid to ask questions. Your health, maybe even your life could be risked by using inferior products. Educate yourself. There is an unbelievable amount of information available, quite literally at your fingertips. Go to your local library, look things up online. There is no excuse for being uninformed. With so many products out there, you should have little trouble finding the best product for you.

Here are a few points for you to remember.

Once you find a good, trustworthy company, stick with them. You cannot be too careful. A quick search on the internet will provide you with a good place to start. Talk to your physician. You may get a few leads on reputable companies and advice on dosage. Do not be afraid to ask questions. Your health, maybe even your life could be risked by using inferior products. Educate yourself. There is an unbelievable amount of information available, quite literally at your fingertips. Go to your local library, look things up online. There is no excuse for being uninformed. With so many products out there, you should have little trouble finding the best product for you.